Nick Nikon - Put It On Me | Music Video

Nikon D5300 Discountimg src=”http://cdn.stupiddope.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/nick-nikon-undercovers-ep1.jpg”>

You should be familiar with Nick Nikon, no he isn’t a household name yet, but you really should be familiar with this young man. Today Nick returns with a brand new set of visuals for our viewing enjoyment, unleashing the clip for his track “Put It On Me”, off his project, UnderCovers.

The video finds Nick doing his thing, hitting the studio to showcase his sounds, and gives us a dope clip that coincides with the dark, ballad sounding track. This shit is too damn dope, as is his latest project. Check out the video after the jump and speak your mind down below.

Signed, Jesse James

Short URL: http://stupidDOPE.com/?p=257615
Source: Stupiddope

New And Exclusive Micro-Site Content

ePHOTOzine’s Micro-Site Roundup - Find out what’s been happening on our five Micro-Sites.

Posted:

Here’s a roundup of the exclusive content we’ve got for you to have a read of on our five micro-sites this week:

On PENTAXPORTAL this week, you can take a look at some top tips for photographing seals with your Pentax camera, and check out some top Pentax sunset photos. Plus, the brand new K-3 DSLR has been reviewed on site this week, and there’s news of new images from Ricoh Imaging brand ambassadors.

Over On EIZO ColorZone, you can learn how to perform a monitor viewing angle check and find out why ColorNavigator software is a great tool for aiding calibration. Plus, there’s news of a new 3D CG colour management handbook that’s now available.

Meanwhile, on Olympus Image Space this week, there are techniques on how to use blur creatively, and there’s news on Olympus workshops taking place over the coming months with Damian McGillicuddy and Steve Gosling. Plus, news on the Olympus Impressions ‘Fall’ competition, and &;100 accessory cashback when you buy an Olympus OM-D E-M1 camera have also gone live.

On Totally Tamron this week, you can learn some top tips for taking better photos of ice with your Tamron lens, plus there are some top Tamron portrait photos for you to take a look at. Don’t forget to take a look at David Pritchard’s blog the days zoom past, too, as he’s been out-and-about with his newly acquired Tamron 24-70mm lens.

Last but not least, on Nikon Nation this week, you can check out some ideas and tips for on location portrait shoots, get creative with colour balance and lots more. Plus, don’t miss the Nikon D5300 Deals DSLR review and news of ono-to one training with Nikon School in December.

Make sure you check back to the Micro-Sites regularly, as new and exclusive content is posted weekly!


Source: Ephotozine

Nikon D5300 hands-on review

Nikon Nikon D5300 Cyber Monday Deal at a glance:

  • 24.2-million-pixel, APS-C-sized CMOS sensor
  • 1.037-million-dot, 3.2in, 170&; LCD screen
  • Expeed 4 image processor
  • 39-point AF system with nine cross-type sensors
  • ISO 100-25,600
  • Price &;730 body only
  • See product shots of the Nikon D5300

Nikon D5300 - Introduction

While the serious enthusiast is unlikely to be swayed into buying a Nikon DSLR over a Canon model purely because the Nikon camera is newer, the reality is that at the non-premium end of the market this is how some people make their buying decisions. ‘Newer’ must mean ‘better’.

This demand for the ‘new’ explains why we see such short product cycles in the camera market, and why manufacturers feel the need to introduce even small advances in technology or feature sets in cameras with completely new names - rather than a ‘Mark II’ type of naming format.

Those familiar with Nikon’s range of DSLRs may not see the sense in the company’s introduction of the new D5300, especially as Nikon will maintain the D5200 alongside this model in the range - new and old together. By doing so, though, Nikon expands the number of cameras it has on offer and the number of price points it can cover, while also being able to have a model that can carry a ‘New’ sticker, and which introduces new features to the price band in which it will sit.

That’s not to say that the Nikon D5300 isn’t different to the D5200, though, as a new processor, new body design and the integration of wireless communications do genuinely bring additional benefits to the photographer.

Nikon D5300 - Design and handling

Nikon is very pleased that it has achieved a new way of constructing camera bodies, which it describes as a ‘monocoque’. Instead of there being a chassis, onto which the components and the body shell are attached, the D5300 is designed to have everything screwed to the insides of the body form itself: exoskeleton, rather then the usual endoskeleton.

Image: The top of the camera houses only a few control points, keeping the layout simple and unintimidating for newcomers. A stereo microphone lives in front of the hotshoe

The D5300’s body shell is also made of a new material, although Nikon won’t say what that new material is - just that it is new. The upshot is that the body is less heavy than it might have been, and is 25g lighter, including the battery, than the camera it doesn’t replace, the D5200.

I’m not entirely sure that when I used the camera I could appreciate the exact weight loss that has occurred, but I was able to enjoy the fact that this is truly a lightweight DSLR, of the type that we might not mind carrying all day, over the shoulder, in a bag or in a large pocket. The body is very small too, although it is balanced with a reassuringly large grip for the right hand. It seems ironic that a small and light camera should need a large grip, but I found it allowed me to be aware I was carrying the camera, and should a larger lens be attached it will help to support the forward pull of such a weight distribution.

Image: The body styling will be familiar to those used to the Nikon 5000 series, as will the standard menu. The 3.2in flip-out screen has impressive visibility

The buttons are arranged much as one might expect, with all the principal controls falling easily to the finger or thumb. The rear 3.2in LCD is very nicely bright and clear, with its 1.037-million-dot resolution. Nikon has set the viewing panel into the glass screen, so there are no gaps or internal reflections, which produces good contrast and a clear view from a quoted angled of up to 170&;. I am impressed.

In live view, the screen works well when the camera is held low or high, and I found the AF quick enough and seemingly accurate. The response of the shutter in live view also seems good.

Image: Nikon has retained its choice of layouts for the rear-screen display, with text-based and graphically expressed options to suit personal preferences

Nikon D5300 - Still to test

The principal changes in this model are of the sort that will only be proved in testing, but at this stage their potential is worth pointing out. Using the higher-capacity Expeed 4 processor, Nikon claims it has been able to reduce noise in its images through the use of more complicated calculations. A related benefit is that now noise levels are lower the company is comfortable offering a higher ISO setting - the Nikon D5300 allows ratings of up to ISO 25,600. More complex calculations also provide the potential for better white balance assessment in automatic modes via a more comprehensive assessment of the scene, and a better rendition of colour overall.

Lower noise should also lead to better resolution of detail from the 24.2-million-pixel sensor, as should Nikon’s decision to do without the micro-blurring effects of a low-pass (anti-aliasing) filter. Leaving the low-pass filter off the sensor has become very fashionable, and I suspect it will be a great draw for many photographers. Moir&; in images created by a sensor with 24 million pixels, even an APS-C-sized sensor, is still something that is quite likely to occur, but there is also plenty of software to correct it after the event.

The other thing to note is that this model sees the introduction of a new battery cell, which Nikon says increases capacity from 500 shots to 600 compared to the cell used in the D5200. It annoys me when companies change their battery forms, but on this occasion the new cell and that used in the D5200 are interchangeable.

Obviously, I couldn’t test the battery life of the camera, but we should take the increase as good news. I will also have to wait to test the Wi-Fi and GPS capabilities of this new model, but neither can be held as negative points just for their inclusion. The Wi-Fi integration means users will be able to control the camera from an Android or iOS device, and will be able to wirelessly transfer images for viewing, editing and sending while on the go.

Image: The new battery, which is backwards compatible with the D5200, offers a longer life. There is no low-pass filter on the sensor, for extra resolution

Nikon D5300 - Conclusion

It would be easy to dismiss the Nikon D5300 for being too similar to the D5200, but that really isn’t the point. There is not much wrong with the D5200, and the changes that this new model brings can only make it better. Perhaps Nikon could have called it the D5200 ll, but I’m not sure it matters one bit.

The Nikon D5300 will cost around &;730 body only and be available from 14 November.


Source: Amateurphotographer

Nikon Announces the D5300, Its First DSLR with Built-In WiFi

Adding to the deluge of camera announcements this month, Nikon chose today to release an update to its D5200 consumer DSLR. The new camera, the Nikon D5300 Buy Cheap, isn’t a huge breakthrough, but Nikon managed to pack in a few new features that’ll help the shooter keep up with competitors like the Canon 70D.

There are a few updates to the camera, but the headliner is the fact that Nikon has finally added built-in WiFi - no need to go out and purchase a WU-1a adapter. It’s also the first Nikon SLR to feature built-in GPS.

The new WiFi and GPS features are joined by an “enhanced” 24.2-megapixel DX sensor without an anti-aliasing filter (say hello to sharper images and potential moire) and a powerful EXPEED 4 processor. That translates into the ability to shoot 1080/60p video, 5fps continuous in both live view and via the viewfinder, a max ISO of 25,600 and better battery life to boot (700 shots vs 500).

Other notable features include a 3.2-inch 1.04M-dot articulating display and a 39-point AF system that works with Nikon’s Scene Recognition System for metering. Here are a few more pictures:

For more info on the new camera, feel free to head over to Nikon’s press room and read up on the details. The D5300 will be available sometime this month in Black, Red and Gray for $800, or in a kit with the AF-S 18-140mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR lens for $1,400.


Source: Petapixel

Nikon announces D5300, its first DSLR camera with built-in Wi-Fi

Nikon has a new camera announcement for this month and this one is the upgrade to its famous D5200 consumer-grade DSLR. The new camera will be known as the Nikon Nikon D5300 Coupons and it is not much of an improvement over the previous model.

The Nikon D5300 does pack some nifty features which would most likely place it against the Canon 70D, which is quite an impressive feat for this camera. However, we feel it is unlikely that it could beat its competitor.

There are a few updates tot he camera, but the key new feature is that the D5300 has built-in Wi-Fi capability. This makes this DSLR camera the first from Nikon to feature built-in Wi-Fi, it is also the first DSLR from Nikon which is packed with built-in GPS.

The D5300 further includes a 24.2 megapixel DX sensor without an anti-aliasing filter (this means sharper images and potential for moire) and the powerful EXPEED 4 processor. The DSLR can achieve the ability to shoot 1080/60p video, 5fps continuous shooting in live view as well as viewfinder, a maximum ISO of 25,600 and improved battery which provides 700 shots after full charge.

The DSLR also includes a 3.2-inch 1.04M-dot articulating display and an impressive 39-point AF system which works with Nikon’s Scene Recognition System used for metering.

This new camera is certainly one mean device. The Nikon D5300 will be available sometime later this month and will come in Black, Red and Gray colors. It will be priced at $800 body only and for $1,400 in kit which includes a AF-S 18-140mm f/3.5-5.6 ED VR lens.

Source: Nikon USA


Source: Gigjets

Nikon Unveils D5300 DSLR With WiFi, GPS

By Greg Tarr On Oct 17 2013 - 10:59am


Nikon D5300 Offers's D5300 ($799 body only) is the company's first DSLR to incorporate WiFi and GPS geotagging.

Melville, N.Y. - Nikon introduced Thursday its D5300 D-SLR, offering an enhanced 24.2 megapixel CMOS sensor and a Nikon-first built-in Wi-Fi and GPS.

The company also added an AF-S NIKKOR 58mm f/1.4G lens prime lens.

Nikon’s D5300, which will be available in October for a $799.95 (body only) suggested retail price or $1,399.95 for a kit including the camera and an AF-S Nikkor 18-140mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR lens , is the company’s first D-SLR with built-in Wi-Fi and GPS functionality to provide instant photo sharing with smartphones or tablets, and to enable geotagging images.

The camera incorporates a 24.2-megapizel DX-format CMOS sensor and is features a compact, lightweight ergonomically body design.

Other key features include a 3.2-inch swiveling Vari-angle LCD display; a 39-point AF system with 9 cross-type sensors; 5 fps continuous shooting, FullHD 1080p video capture with built-in stereo microphone; intuitive scene recognition and a variety of image efects and in-camera editing tools.

The D5300 will be available in a choice of black, red and gray body colors.

The AF-S Nikkor 58mm f/1.4G lens, which will be available in October for a $1,699.95 suggested retail price, will accommodate both FX and DX format cameras offering high quality low-light shooting performance.

Nikon said the unusual 58mm focal length is ideal for portraits, landscapes and street photography.


Source: Twice

Nikon Coolpix S6600 Review

Nikon D5300 Buy Cheapp>

Introduction

The Nikon Coolpix S6600 is a back-illuminated 16 megapixel digital compact camera which also boasts an articulated screen, wi-fi capability, 12x optical zoom and FullHD video. As part of the Style range, the Nikon Coolpix S6600’s curvy body looks good and is packed with technology. But will it cope in our stringent test? Costing around &;199, the Nikon Coolpix S6600 is available in silver, red, black, purple and white.

Ease of Use

It’s always nice to see the designers of a camera start from scratch when updating a model. The Nikon Coolpix S6600 is one such example because it looks completely different to the S6500. The new model has a larger, curvier lens bezel - undoubtedly to incorporate the 12x optical zoom inside the thin chassis. The rest of the camera has been rounded off to carry on the feel which flows around the corners for a fluid, organic look to it.

Because of the movable screen on the back, a few of the buttons have been placed on the top plate in order to retain a reasonable size to them. The Shooting and Playback buttons (used for flicking between taking pictures and replaying them) sit centrally with the sunken power button situated next to the shutter release. On the back and considering the restricted space, a large space has been reserved as a thumb rest. The rest of the buttons are crammed in underneath, which is a bit unusual. The space for resting your thumb could be halved.

The majority of the space is occupied by the articulating screen. It twists all around so is perfect for self portraits or low/high angle photography. It’s great to see a twisting screen on a compact camera, they’re so few and far between, but extremely useful.

Front

Rear

The Nikon Coolpix S6600 is part of a growing number of digital compact cameras that have built-in wi-fi capability. The wi-fi menu is in the set-up section of the Main menu. It can’t upload images directly onto the internet, but it can transfer images to your smart phone for you to then upload from there. You can also add a GPS location to your pictures if you’re abroad and wish to show friends on Google Maps. There’s also an option to use the smart device as a remote control for taking pictures. You have to download the Nikon Wireless Mobile Utility from iTunes or the Google Play store.

The sensor on the Nikon Coolpix S6600 is a back-illuminated type sensor, which - in theory - reacts better in low light. The reason is can do this is all down to the way the sensor is constructed. Traditional sensors have circuitry around each pixel and this in turn blocks light getting onto the photo site. Back illuminated sensors have the circuitry placed on the back of the sensor. Because it’s then out of the way, more light gets onto the pixels and increases the performance of the sensor. The name stems from the appearance of the sensor as it sits in the camera. Because the circuitry is at the back, it looks as though it’s on backwards and that the light is hitting the rear of what would be a traditional sensor.

There are a number of continuous shooting modes on the S6600. The Continuous Hi mode takes seven frames in just over half a second. Taking reflexes into consideration and any shutter lag, it could probably take around ten frames in a second if it wasn’t capped at seven.

Front

Top

Start up time seems pretty standard at 2.5sec. We’ve seen a spate of cameras covering a faster time recently and we thought maybe it showed an increase in technology, but it could’ve just been a coincidence. Saying that, pressing the power off button seems to put a long winded close down of the systems into operation. It must take another two seconds to close the lens, which doesn’t sound much, but when you’re stood watching it, it’s like a case of a watched kettle never boiling.

There are a number of other continuous or burst modes within the menu system such as the pre-shooting cache. Two high speed continuous shooting modes (120fps and 60fps) as well as the BSS (Best Shot Selector) and Multi-Shot 16.

Playback is operated using the button with the arrow icon on the top plate of the camera. It can switch on the playback regardless of whether the camera is switched on or not. If the camera is off, you just need to hold the button down for a few seconds so that it doesn’t think you’re knocking it while carrying the camera. The display is a standard amount of basic information. It shows simple shooting features, such as the ISO, frame number, flash status, battery level etc. You can change this in the set up part of the Main menu. There’s an option to hide it all, show it constantly (the auto mode will lose the info after a few seconds), Add a video frame to it or add a rule of thirds grid.

Memory Card Slot

Battery Compartment

Pressing ok while the information is on screen will bring up the Quick effects menu and there’s options for all types of vintage or retro effects, such as Vivid, High key, Toy camera, multiple cross processing options, cross screen, miniature effect and cyanotype. The latter adds a blue cast that is based on old cyanotype style photography which is the foundation of blue prints. You can access the Quick menu in the Playback menu as well. There’s also a D-Lighting option - which is a kind of HDR feature. It gently adds more detail to shadow areas while capping burn out in highlights. You can add red-eye correction and if you like your portraits, there’s the Glamour retouch to add a bit of pizzazz to your face.

Upon opening the Nikon Coolpix S6600’s box, we were faced with a thick looking booklet which is actually a Quick Start guide and is in multiple languages, so you don’t have to read the whole thing. There’s also a CD with Nikon ViewNX 2 which is Nikon’s editing and tagging suite for your photographs. The camera comes with a lithium ion battery, USB cable and a charging unit. The unit comes in two pieces; the first accepts the USB cable which doubles as a charging cable and it has a two pronged mains connector. This can alternatively be plugged into the second unit which adapts it to the UK connector. There’s also a wrist strap to keep it safe while in between photographs.

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Source: Photographyblog

Luxoft Holding Inc : Luxoft Consulting Awarded Contract To Replace Business Sysytem At Prinston Plasma Physics Laboratory

slidesp>New York, NY, June 16, 2010 - Luxoft Consulting Strategies, Inc (LCSI), a division of Luxoft Consulting, Inc, has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) to provide strategic consulting on the planning for an enterprise resource planning (ERP) replacement project. Work on the project began in May 2010.

LCSI will assist PPPL in selecting the new ERP platform that will enable the laboratory to increase its operational efficiency and enhance its collaboration with the DOE, customers, and suppliers. Specifically, LCSI will be responsible for requirements gathering, assessment of current state abilities of PPPL’s people, process and technology, and authoring a future state vision and roadmap that reflects the vision of PPPL’s management team. LCSI will also provide assistance to PPPL in creating a request for proposal to potential ERP vendors, and assist with the evaluation of vendor responses. Optionally, LCSI may provide the Independent Verification and Validation (IVV) of the winning vendor’s implementation performance.

Drawing on its existing implementation and research experience, LCSI is firmly positioned to deliver vendor selection strategy and perform the IVV mission. “With IVV, LCSI will be making a full implementation-lifecycle commitment to PPPL’s ERP success,” said Stuart Selip, the head of Luxoft Consulting Strategies, Inc. “Given PPPL’s vision of enabling a world powered by fusion energy and leading discoveries in plasma science and technology, we at LCSI are thrilled to be a part of an effort that would truly benefit mankind.”

About Luxoft Consulting, Inc

Established as a consulting arm of Luxoft, Luxoft Consulting, Inc. delivers consulting expertise, on-site staffing, and project management services in all aspects of Enterprise Information Management, Enterprise Resource Planning, and Rich Internet Technologies to Fortune 500 and leading mid-market companies. The company’s suite of services is optimized to guide customers through the right strategic decisions —from the very first workshop through implementation and final delivery. Luxoft Consulting helps clients grow, maximize ROI and gain competitive advantage in the market by delivering cost effective, mature and industry-specific solutions. The company’s expertise spans the financial services, banking, insurance, media, pharmaceutical, and education sectors. Luxoft Consulting is headquartered in New York, NY. www.luxoft.com/consulting/

About PPPL

PPPL, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and managed by Princeton University, is a collaborative national center for science and innovation leading to an attractive fusion energy source. Fusion is the process that powers the sun and the stars. In the interior of stars, matter is converted into energy by the fusion, or joining, of the nuclei of light atoms to form heavier elements. At PPPL, physicists use a magnetic field to confine plasma. Scientists hope eventually to use fusion energy for the generation of electricity. http://www.pppl.gov/

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Source: 4-traders

Nexus 5 said to be ‘half the price’ of the iPhone 5S

A source says the new Google phone will come with an attractive price for those that have been hankering for a new Nexus.

(Credit: MacRumors)

The hype and rumors we’re hearing around the upcoming Nexus 5, expected from LG and Google later this month, is that it could instantly become the new Android phone to beat. But the latest whisperings hint that it could also give the iPhone 5s iphone cases otterbox pink xanax a run for its money when it comes to how much of your money you have to shell out for one.

TechRadar says a “source familiar with Google” has told the site that the successor to the popular but LTE-less Nexus 4 will ship in the latter part of October and cost “half the price” of the iPhone 5S.

What’s a little tricky about this is that the source seems to be referring to United Kingdom prices and ship dates, which can be different from what we see in the United States. If the Nexus 5 were to be half of what an unlocked iPhone 5S sells for at retail stateside (it starts at $649 for 16 GB contract-free with a T-Mobile SIM), that would mean we could see a new unlocked Nexus that, according to TechRadar’s source, will meet the specs of the iPhone 5S, but for less than $350.

That would certainly be a welcome deal for Nexus fans hoping for a repeat of the $299 price tag for an unlocked Nexus 4 right out of the gate.

We’ll see in the coming weeks if Google actually offers such a pre-holiday bargain on a top-flight phone, or if we’ve just caught wind of some sort of UK-only pricing scheme or just total bunk.

Be sure to read up on everything else we expect in a new Nexus, and let us know in the comments if you plan to get one of your own.


Source: Cnet

Easy way to check iPhone 5s in-store availability near you

5s iphone cases nike sandals for boys youth-Availability.jpg”>

If you are in the USA and trying to buy an iPhone 5s, head over to http://iphone-check.herokuapp.com/, enter your zip code, cellphone carrier and pick a color, and then it will show you availability at Apple Stores “near you.”

I used the site to find a Verizon, 16 GB, Space Gray iPhone 5s in my area. I placed an order for in-store pickup, and about two hours later I was walking out of the Apple Store with a new iPhone.

Two caveats: First, “near you” is a relative term. The site seems to always show 20 Apple Stores, but some of them might be quite a distance from you. For me, the last store on the list was about 350 miles (and nearly a six-hour drive) away. Each result is linked to an Apple Retail Store, so if you aren’t sure where it is, click on it to get the address. Second, availability can change fast. My local Apple Retail Store said that they were only filling orders through http://store.apple.com, which had been designated as “in-store pickup.” The good news is that I knew I had an iPhone waiting for me before I got into the car. I definitely recommend using that method rather than driving to the store and hoping that they still have what you want in stock.


Source: Tuaw